How to get the best night’s sleep

With the current state of things and life as we know it changing for the foreseeable future, it’s safe to say that there’s been a lot to contend with in recent months. Lockdown life has taken its toll on our bodies and mind.

Weeks spent at home may have given us the space to discover sides of ourselves we didn’t know existed, but it’s also awarded us time to think, stress and worry.

By day, lockdown stresses have given us a new mission – to stay healthy and happy. They’ve also left most tossing and turning all night unable to achieve a decent night’s sleep.

The importance of sleep shouldn’t be underestimated. The time you spend snoozing gives you the rest and restoration your body and mind needs, especially during stressful periods like these.

With a few simple tweaks, you can gear yourself up for the best night’s sleep you’ve had in a long, long time…

Spend more time outdoors

What you do in the day has more of an impact on your nighttime habits than you may think. Your circadian rhythm, better known as the ‘body clock’, dictates when you naturally wake up and retire to the land of nod. It governs your brain, body, and hormones, which makes keeping it in check throughout the day vital for good sleep quantity and quality.

With lockdown measures recently eased and an unlimited amount of outdoor exercise now permitted, it’s the perfect time to get your circadian rhythm back on track.

Spending more time outdoors and increasing your exposure to natural light will not only boost energy reserves throughout the day but make it easier to fall asleep come bedtime.

Now for the science… This study found that just a couple of hours of natural light exposure per day can increase sleep time by two hours.

Keep tech to a minimum

We all know the power of a bedtime routine, and whilst lockdown life has made sticking to your usual regime a little more difficult, there’s one rule that you should abide by no matter what.

Today’s society is technology mad, and devices such as smartphones and tablets no doubt make many aspects of life that bit easier. Where they don’t help is during those hours before bed. The blue light emitted by electronics can trick your brain into thinking it’s daytime all the time, which isn’t great for your body clock.

Keep blue light exposure to a minimum at least two hours before you go to bed. If you can’t, invest in additional technology, such as blue light blocking apps and glasses.

Watch what you eat and drink

What you consume during those witching hours can affect just how well you sleep. Set a cut off time for foods and drinks that contain caffeine to ensure those focus, energy, and performance-enhancing plus-points don’t disrupt your sleep.

The cut off time for caffeine-containing goodies should preferably be between 3pm and 4pm, as caffeine stays in the bloodstream for up to eight hours.

Those having trouble sleeping should also steer clear of the hard stuff. Alcohol can often induce sleep, but it reduces nighttime melatonin production to disturb natural sleep patterns.

This is one of the main reasons why you may feel extra groggy and sleep-deprived the morning after an evening tipple.

Create a haven for sleep

The environment in which you sleep will determine sleep quality and quantity. Your bedroom should be a sanctuary for sleep, and wool is the only material you need to guarantee a cosy, sleep-inducing vibe.

As well as providing the ultimate snuggle factor and being great for the planet, a wool bedspread will successfully regulate body temperature. This can have a profound effect on your sleep as British Wool details:

“Wool has natural insulating and breathable properties that help to keep you warm or cool depending on the season. If you suffer from menopause-related night sweats and hot flushes, wool bedding can help you sleep better and longer. Wool fibre breathes naturally, absorbing moisture from the atmosphere, and then releasing it when the atmosphere is drier.”

Become one step closer to a better night’s sleep by shopping our wool bedspreads today.